Graphic image in which a large billboard looms over a street as people flee before it. The billboard reads "Bad publicity: an Adfree Cities blog series on how omnipresent advertising shapes our lives"

Advertising, public health and the pollution of discourse 

In this blog, part of the Bad Publicity series, Dr Nason Maari, Lecturer in Inequalities and Global Health Policy at the University of Edinburgh, examines how outdoor advertising pollutes our environment and health. Moreover, advertising effects even the way we talk about health and our expectations of what it means to be healthy at all, as the example of smoking ads makes clear. …Continue reading Advertising, public health and the pollution of discourse 

A collage image shows a Toyota bZ4X on top of images of mines and protesters.

Undermined: how electric vehicle advertising hides a global web of extraction, exploitation and destruction 

Protests in a remote corner of Argentina disrupt the cosy picture of a green future promised by advertising for electric vehicles. In this blog we explore the hidden web of supply chains that support the EV “revolution” and the true cost of electric mobility for communities and ecosystems around the world. …Continue reading Undermined: how electric vehicle advertising hides a global web of extraction, exploitation and destruction 

Graphic image in which a large billboard looms over a street as people flee before it. The billboard reads "Bad publicity: an Adfree Cities blog series on how omnipresent advertising shapes our lives"

Plugged in: how outdoor advertising and surveillance technology promote commercial behaviours

In this blog, part of the Bad Publicity series, we draw on Dr Thomas Dekeyser’s 2018 essay ‘The material geographies of advertising’ to understand how surveillance technologies enable outdoor advertising to more effectively integrate into the urban environment, increasing its capacity to affect our behaviours in line with advertisers’ intentions. …Continue reading Plugged in: how outdoor advertising and surveillance technology promote commercial behaviours